Travel Tips

Booking Procedures
  1. You make an inquiry
  2. We develop a first draft itinerary.
  3. Several variations are made until the perfect itinerary is reached.
  4. A comprehensive availability check on all accommodations and request provisional bookings.
  5. If all accommodations are available, you are sent a final itinerary for proceeding of the deposit.
  6. Operations procedure to submits booking vouchers and makes necessary deposits to all the accommodations to finalize the bookings
What if I do a Late booking?

When booked well in advance (6 months or more), there is usually no problem in securing all the desired accommodations. However, when we encounter full locations, we place immediate bookings at alternate locations and then, time permitting, present these options to you for a final decision. Typically, we have been very good at getting excellent locations, even last minute. While it is true that many lodges do indeed fill up quickly, we find that rooms usually open up as the date gets closer due to the release of rooms from block bookings

Medical Tips

We have compiled this information for you from the Center for Disease Control (CDC) website (www.cdc.gov/travel) for your easy reference as a traveler planning to visit Tanzania / East Africa.

Food and waterborne diseases are the number one cause of illness in travelers. Travelers’ diarrhea can be caused by viruses, bacteria, or parasites, which are found throughout the region and can contaminate food or water. Infections may cause diarrhea and vomiting (E. coli, Salmonella, cholera, and parasites), fever (typhoid fever and toxoplasmosis), or liver damage (hepatitis). Make sure your food and drinking water are safe.

Malaria is a preventable infection that can be fatal if left untreated. Prevent infection by taking prescription antimalarial drugs and protecting yourself against mosquito bites (see below). Travelers to East Africa should take one of the following antimalarial drugs: mefloquine, doxycycline, or Malarone(tm). Your risk of malaria may be high in these countries, including cities.

The CDC recommends the following vaccines (as appropriate for age). See your doctor at least 4–6 weeks before your trip to allow time for shots to take effect.

  • Hepatitis A or immune globulin (IG).
  • Hepatitis B, if you might be exposed to blood (for example, health­care workers), have sexual contact with the local population, stay longer than 6 months, or be exposed through medical treatment.
  • Rabies, if you might be exposed to wild or domestic animals through your work or recreation.
  • Typhoid, particularly if you are visiting developing countries in this region.
  • Yellow fever*, if you travel anywhere outside urban areas
  • As needed, booster doses for tetanus­diphtheriameasles, and a one-­time dose of polio vaccine for adults. Hepatitis B vaccine is now recommended for all infants and for children ages 11–12 years who did not receive the series as infants.

*YELLOW FEVER – is required for ALL persons from yellow fever endemic countries/regions. All individuals in transit for 12 hours or more and/or who leave the immediate airport vicinity in a yellow fever endemic area are required to get vaccinated. All individuals from yellow fever endemic regions traveling by way of air, marine and land are required to get vaccinated. The Ministry of Health and Social Welfare of the United Republic of Tanzania has reinstalled HEALTH SURVEILLANCE DESKS in all borders, ports and international airports. PLEASE CARRY YOUR HEALTH CERTIFICATES WITH YOU WHEN ENTERING TANZANIA.

*YELLOW FEVER UPDATE (2/28/2017): If you have been immunized once for Yellow Fever, you may have lifetime immunity. Your travel clinic physician can advise you based on your personal health profile. If you are covered for life, the clinic may update your yellow card to indicate “valid for life” as well as provide a letter of exemption to ensure that you are not immunized on site.

To stay healthy, do…

  • Wash hands often with soap and water.
  • Drink only bottled or boiled water, or carbonated (bubbly) drinks in cans or bottles. Avoid tap water, fountain drinks, and ice cubes.
  • Eat only thoroughly cooked food or fruits and vegetables that hve been peeled. Remember: boil it, cook it, peel it, or forget it.
  • If you travel to an area where there is risk for malaria, take your malaria prevention medication before, during, and after travel, as directed. (See your doctor for a prescription.)
  • Protect yourself from insects by remaining in well­screened areas, using repellents (applied sparingly at 4­hour intervals) and mosquito nets, and wearing long­sleeved shirts and long pants from dusk through dawn.
  • To prevent fungal and parasitic infections, keep feet clean and dry, and do not go barefoot.
  • Always use latex condoms to reduce the risk of HIV and other sexually transmitted diseases.

To avoid getting sick…

  • Don’t eat food purchased from street vendors.
  • Don’t drink beverages with ice.
  • Don’t eat dairy products unless you know they have been pasteurized.
  • Don’t share needles with anyone.
  • Don’t handle animals (especially monkeys, dogs, and cats), to avoid bites and serious diseases (including rabies and plague).
  • Don’t swim in fresh water, including Lake Malawi. Salt water is usually safer.

What you need to bring with you…

  • Long­sleeved shirts and long pants to wear while outside whenever possible, to prevent illnesses carried by insects (e.g., malaria, dengue, filariasis, leishmaniasis, and onchocerciasis).
  • Insect repellent containing DEET (diethylmethyltoluamide), in 30%–35% strength for adults and 6%–10% for children.
  • Over­the­counter antidiarrheal medicine to take if you have diarrhea.
  • Iodine tablets and water filters to purify water if bottled water is not available.
  • Sunblock, sunglasses, hat.
  • Prescription medications: make sure you have enough to last during your trip, as well as a copy of the prescription(s).
Food, drink and dietary requirements

I have special dietary requirements – will they be catered for?
We will try our very hardest to accommodate all dietary requirements but in some out-of-the-way places it can be very difficult to guarantee. We will let you know if there are places on your itinerary where this is the case. Please let us know at the time of booking of any food requirements or allergies and we’ll pass the information onto your leader. It is also a great idea to bring a card with your dietary requirements written in the local language for those times you are eating away from the group.

What will the food be like on my trip?
Food is one of the most exciting parts of travel. There may be some familiar fare but often you’ll be confronted with the new, interesting and downright weird of the culinary world but we like to think of it as an adventure for all the senses. In addition to this, our flexible itineraries often allow you to eat with the group or branch out on your own – this means you can eat to suit any budget or desire.

Can I drink the water in the countries I visit?
In some destinations it may not be wise to drink the local water. For more details, you can find country-specific information in our fantastic Destination Pages, which can be found in the red menu bar at the top of our home page, or by going to the belo and then choosing the destination you are travelling to.

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Currency information

Major foreign currencies – particularly USD , POUNDS and EUROS are accepted and are convertible at banks and bureau de changes in the main towns and tourist areas. In general, credit cards are of little use  Credit cards are not widely accepted and when they are accepted, they carry poor exchange rates and are subject to processing fees (between 5-10%). Some banks offer ATM facilities against international credit cards, but again the rates are typically poor and the amount that can be withdrawn is limited. ATMs are not available at all elsewhere.

Travel insurance

Do I need travel insurance?
Travel insurance is compulsory for all Travelicious travellers and should be taken out at the time of booking. You must provide proof of your travel insurance on the first day of your trip; you will not be able to join the trip without it.

What does my policy need to cover?
At a minimum, your travel insurance should be ‘comprehensive’, providing cover against personal accident, death, medical expenses, emergency repatriation and personal liability, with a minimum coverage of US$200,000. We also strongly recommend it covers cancellation, curtailment and loss of luggage and personal effects. If you obtain travel insurance through us you acknowledge that you are satisfied with the level of insurance we have arranged.

Visa information

How do I find out about the visa requirements for the trip I am interested in?
While we do include information in our Trip Notes about visa requirements, we always recommend that passengers check with their local embassy as visa rules can change without warning. Embassy websites in your home country will always have information about requirements, visa costs and will provide the required forms. If you are uncomfortable with the visa process, you can visit a travel agent who can arrange these for you at a cost.

How do I organise my Visa?
Please contact the relevant local embassy, or visit a travel agent, to organise your visa/s.

Do you help with Visas?
Travelicious can’t assist in the actual application of visas, but you can do this through the embassy or with the support of a travel agent.

My application says I need a letter of invitation or other supporting documentation, do you provide these?
There are certain destinations, such as Central Asia and Iran, where you will need support documentation from Travelicious in order to apply for your visa. The ‘visa section’ of you Trip Notes will include information about what you need to send to us (scanned passports, employment letters etc.).

Safety information

I am concerned about the political stability of the country through which my trip will travel.
The safety of our passengers, leaders and operators is a major priority. With this in mind. While we take all the precautions we can to make sure your belongings are safe, however Travel insurance is a must and a lockable bag or money belt will always help too.

What is the best way to carry money?
We recommend having access to money from a variety of sources – cash, cards and travel money cards are all commonly used. Check your Trip Notes and the relevant Destination Page on our website for more country-specific information.

What should I bring?

General Packing List

  • In general, pack lightly. Leave room for gifts and souvenirs. Soft­sided luggage packs more easily into the safari vehicle.
  • Always carry passport, airline tickets and money on your person. A fanny pack or moneybag that hangs around the neck works well.
  • In case luggage doesn’t arrive the same day you do, put enough clothing and supplies for the first day in your carry­on luggage.
  • If taking a domestic flight luggage weight restrictions range between 15-­20 kgs (33­-44 lbs) total per person.
  • If climbing Mt. Kilimanjaro or Mt. Meru, additional supplies will be needed.
  • A plastic bag ban has gone into effect as of June 1, 2019. 

Footwear

  • Sturdy, comfortable shoes, preferably waterproof. They will get dirty.
  • Tennis shoes or sandals for lounging in the evening
  • Comfortable, breathable socks

Clothing

  • Shorts, mid­-thigh or longer (not advisable for village visits)
  • Lightweight, breathable pants
  • Short-­sleeved shirts, cool and breathable (neutral colors are best, avoid black, dark blue and bright red)
  • Bathing suit if staying at a lodge with a swimming pool or if visiting Zanzibar
  • Long­-sleeved fleece or sweater for evenings and/or early mornings
  • Rain jacket or rain poncho
  • Women: pants (capri-length or longer) and shirts that cover the shoulder are advisable for village visits. Lightweight dresses or skirts that cover the knees are optional depending on how rural your village visit is but can also be worn for evening dining at the accommodations.
  • Men: short­-sleeve shirts with collars (for visiting villages or evening dining at the accommodations).
  • Keep valuable jewelry to a minimum
Note: Laundry service is available at most lodges either at a nominal cost or free of charge in some cases.
Note: Camouflage clothing in Tanzania is prohibited for its  citizens. As such, we suggest that visitors avoid this style of clothing. 

Baggage

  • Day pack, for you to carry
  • Large waterproof duffel bag or backpack

Other

  • Sun hat
  • Maps, guidebooks
  • Scarf (for dust and/or sun)
  • Batteries
  • Sunglasses
  • Binoculars (2 pair are standard in each vehicle –
  • At least 2 Pairs of Binoculars (Nikon Monarch 8×36 or Eagle Optics Ranger 8×42)
  • Money (small Tanzanian bills and/or small US bills for small purchases and tips. Larger US bills and/or travelers checks for bigger purchases)
  • Journal/notebook, pencil and pen
  • Pocket knife (for travelers doing basic camping)
  • Electricity adapter
  • Energy bars and snacks
  • Headlamp or flashlight
  • Playing cards, games, books, Frisbee
  • Camera, memory cards, mini­tripod
  • Mementos for guides and other travelers
  • Personal music device
  • Video camera
  • Travel pillow

Toiletries

  • Small hand towel (spare item)
  • Roll of toilet paper (for some public restrooms)
  • Soap
  • Toothbrush and toothpaste
  • Handi­-wipes
  • Lotion
  • Glasses, contacts, solution
  • Comb, mirror
  • Shampoo (without heavy fragrance)
  • Unscented Deodorant (use cologne/perfume sparingly, if at all, in case it might attract bees or other insects)

Documents

  • Passport (with visa stamp or completed visa application with $50 or $100 US cash, exact change)
  • Yellow fever certificate is REQUIRED if traveling from or through an endemic zone
  • Covid 19 certificate
  • Medical and travel insurance
  • Address book

First Aid

  • Ibuprofen
  • Antiseptic cream
  • Band­Aids
  • Bandages and tape
  • Sunscreen (SPF 15+)
  • Diarrhea medicine
  • Anti­-malaria pills
  • Antibiotics
  • Insect repellent
  • Antihistamines
  • Lip balm with sunscreen
  • Prescription drugs
Climate

Climate Generally dry and hot with cool nights/mornings June-­October and mid­-December­-March; short rains November to mid­-December; long rains April­-May but the seasons can vary. The coastal strip is hot and humid all year round. Temperatures on Mount Kilimanjaro and Meru drop to below freezing.

Electricity system

A 3 rectangular pin UK plug adapter is required to use electrical appliances including video cameras and digital cameras. The plug adapter is placed onto your appliance plug so that it will fit into the 3 rectangular pin electrical sockets. Tanzania electrical sockets are identical to those found in the United Kingdom.
The electrical voltage in Tanzania is 220V while the electrical voltage in the United States is 120V. If you have a dual voltage appliance or a universal power supply capable of operating safely with either 120V or 220V, all you will need is the plug adapter mentioned above. Most newer laptops, digital cameras and video cameras come equipped with a dual voltage power supply. Check to make sure that the input reads 100V – 240V or 120V – 240V.

If you do not have a dual voltage power supply, then in addition to the plug adapter, you will need to purchase a transformer/converter.

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